Top 10 Most Fatal And Dangerous Jobs

Many of us are fortunate to work at desk jobs where the greatest concern to our health might be poor circulation caused by sitting for long periods. However, some jobs are so extreme that occupational hazards far outweigh swollen ankles. Here are the ten most fatally dangerous jobs in the U.S. Do them at your own risk.

Loggers

While it may appeal to those who don’t want to be stuck at a desk job, logging is extremely demanding on the body. Not only that, loggers use heavy equipment, including wood chippers, chainsaws and harvesters; and if you get injured, chances are you won’t make it to a hospital in time because logging normally takes place in remote forests.

Fishermen

If you’ve watched even one episode of “The Deadliest Catch,” you know how dangerous this job is. As with logging, fishing happens far away from medical aid. Fishermen could be hours, if not days away by boat from a hospital. Unless the crew is immediately aware of a man overboard, that man is a goner. They’re also exposed to extreme weather conditions, including freezing cold, wind, waves, storms, hurricanes and typhoons.

Pilots

While you may think that pilots have it easy, their schedules are demanding and their hours irregular, especially for new pilots starting out in the industry. While more seasoned pilots may get the choice of better hours and nicer assignments, both old and new pilots can suffer from exhaustion, which affects their reflexes in an emergency. And, as with loggers and fishermen, access to hospitals is not quick or convenient.

Steel Workers

Someone’s got to build skyscrapers and other structures, and it’s the fearless workers who traverse steel girders on buildings and bridges. Not only do they risk falling to their deaths, but they also face danger from tools and machinery.

Roofers

Roofers may not be exposed to remote locations far from medical assistance, they do have to work outdoors in very hot, sunny weather. And while that may seem like a dream job to some people, roofers have to be in tip-top shape so they can climb ladders, carry tools, wood, shingles and metal from the ground to the roof while keeping their balance on sloped surfaces.

Sanitation Workers

Sanitation workers not only face danger from falling off the trucks they’re balancing on, but they are susceptible to being hit or killed by drivers who speed around them. They are also in danger of being injured by the heavy trucks themselves as well as the moving machinery involved in emptying dumpsters.

Drivers

Delivery drivers, truck drivers, taxi drivers and limousine drivers all fall into this category; and while you might not think driving is hazardous, think again. They all drive in different climates and weather patterns, and for taxi drivers, you never know if an axe murderer is going to climb in your vehicle. Also, delivery and truck drivers have to navigate through crowded cities and load/unload their goods, usually in traffic; this leads to collisions that may injure or kill them.

Construction Supervisors

According to the statistics, job site supervisors have a greater risk of fatal accidents than lower level laborers. As workers at this level often supervise road crews, their risk of dying from being hit by a car is high. They can also suffer injuries or worse from falling objects or tools.

Ranchers

These workers get to be out in nature with large animals. Ah, home on the range. But as attractive and freeing as that may sound, danger lurks at every turn. Large machinery and equipment is involved and can prove injurious or fatal. Large animals can turn from placid to red-zone angry and charge at humans. You can’t argue with 2,000 pounds of muscled bison barreling toward you. Maybe opt for a data entry job instead.

Agricultural Workers

Tractors, hay bailers, threshers and off-road vehicles are the major risks for agricultural workers. Think about it: you’re just an innocent guy leaning over to pick a basket of strawberries just when a vehicle drives by. Wrong place, wrong time.

If you are currently employed in one of these super dangerous jobs and have escaped injury to this point, consider yourself lucky. And unless you have a death wish, maybe consider changing fields so you’ll get to stick around a little longer.