Texting Abbreviations & What They Mean

OMG, WTH? Deciphering today’s textese, or SMS language, seems like an ever-changing endeavor. It refers to abbreviations commonly used in text messaging and internet-based conversations on Skype, Slack, and other apps. So without further ado, here’s what you need to know to keep up with the times.

Internet Abbreviations

These abbrevs (see how I did that?) are commonly used on the internet, in online discussion forums, and social media. It’s more likely that Gen Xers (1965-1985) and Baby Boomers (1945-1964) will use these more than Millennials, who are more likely to communicate via texting.

BRB = Be right back
BRT = Be right there
BTW =
By the way
DGMW =
Don’t get me wrong
EOBD =
End of business day
EOD =
End of discussion
FWIW =
For what it’s worth
HTH =
Hope this helps
IDK =
I don’t know
IMHO =
In my humble opinion
KWIM =
Know what I mean?
NOYB =
None of your business
OMG =
Oh my God
OP =
Original poster/original post
OT =
Off topic
POV = Point of view
ROTFL =
Roll on the floor laughing
TIA =
Thanks in advance
TTYL =
Talk to you later

Examples of messages might be:
“Hi Joe, can you get that sales report to me EOBD? TIA, man, TTYL”

Which translates, in real conversational English, to:

“Hi Joe, can you get that sales report to me by the end of the day? Thanks in advance, man, talk to you later!

“OMG, that skit had me ROTFL!

Which translates, in real conversational English, to

“Oh my God! That skit had me rolling on the floor laughing!”

Text Messaging & SMS (short message service) Abbreviations

These abbreviations are used mostly in phone texting/SMS as opposed to online discussions. So, if you’re a parent out there and want to check up on your kids’ safety, here’s your dictionary.

2moro = Tomorrow
2nte = Tonight
AEAP =
As early as possible
ALAP =
As late as possible
ASAP =
As soon as possible
BFF =
Best friends forever
CTN =
Can’t talk now
CWOT =
Complete waste of time
F2F =
Face to face
FC =
Fingers Crossed
FOAF =
Friend of a friend
GR8 =
Great
IDC =
I don’t care
ILY =
I love you
IRL =
In real life
JC =
Just checking
JK =
Just kidding
JTLYK =
Just to let you know
KFY =
Kiss for you
KMN =
Kill me now
KPC =
Keeping parents clueless
MTFBWY =
May the force be with you
MYOB =
Mind your own business
NP =
No problem
NSFW =
Not safe for work
NVM =
Never mind
OMW = On my way
P911 =
Parent alert
PAL =
Parents are listening
PAW =
Parents are watching
PIR =
Parent in room
POS =
Parent over shoulder
PROPS =
Proper respect or recognition
RU =
Are you
SITD =
Still in the dark
SLAP =
Sounds like a plan
SMIM =
Send me an instant message
TMI =
Too much information
XOXO =
Hugs and kisses

Examples of messages might be:
“CTN, POS. F2F at the mall AEAP”

Which translates, in real conversational English, to:
“I can’t talk now, my parents are over my shoulder. Let’s meet face to face at the mall as early as possible.”

“OMG, SMIM! PAL and I need to KPC”
Which translates, in real conversational English, to:
“Oh my God, send me an instant message. My parents are listening and I need to keep them clueless.”

Deciphering abbreviations doesn’t have to be daunting. But it can make your life a little easier if you can easily communicate in this current text-speak, and you can also watch out for younger family members and friends … JC they’re safe. But don’t let them know what you’re up to, KWIM?